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Do you need a reliable same day scrap metal recycling service?

Please fill out CONTACT FORM  or call 972-278-2625 to arrange free scrap metal and appliance recycling today.

We are available for appliance, scrap metal, car battery recycling, junk car and truck removal in North Dallas, TX Metroplex. Available for residential, industrial, and commercial appliance & scrap metal removal and recycling.

www.DFWappliance.com  is a scrap metal collection company in Dallas, TX. We service home owners, business owners, maintenance departments  and property management companies. Call Today! 972-278-2625

Certain restrictions apply to see if you qualify for free haul off of appliances, electronics and other recyclable metals please fill out contact form or call 972-278-2625

 

Our scrap metal removal includes,

Washer and dryer recycling

FREE Removal of Washers and Dryers!

Air Conditioners and Heaters
Washers and Dryers
Cars, Trucks, Motors and Parts
Computers and Accessories
Exercise Equipment
All Types of Steel
Hot Water Heaters
And More!

Here’s what some of our recent customers had to say about our metal & appliance recycling services.

“These guys do great work. They removed a lot of heavy workout equipment from my garage in a very timely manner. They were on time and very hard workers! Thank You!!!

 “I contacted Andy this morning and 2 hours later my scrap metal pile is gone. Andy came with another employee and made quick, clean work of a fairly large job. This service was fast, courteous and as promised FREE!!!”
Thanks Guys!
“ 

“Thanks for the quick pick up of our old freezer!  It was great to actually have a company show up when they say they would.”


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Mon-Fri:  9AM - 5PM
Saturday:  10AM - 2PM
Phone:  972-278-2625
Email:  recycle@dfwappliance.com 

Free Service Areas: NE Dallas, Garland TX, Firewheel, Murphy, East Richardson, Sachse, East Plano, Woodbridge Wylie TX and More

Limited Free Service and Paid Service To: Addison, Allen TX, Carrollton, Coppell, Far North Dallas, Farmers Branch, Flower Mound, Forney, Frisco, Heath, University Park and Highland Park Texas, Irving, las Colinas, Lewisville, Little Elm, Lower Greenville Dallas, Lucas, McKinney, Mesquite, Oak Lawn Dallas, Parker, Preston Hollow, Royce City, Rockwall, East Rowlett, Stonebriar-Frisco, The Colony, Turtle Creek-Dallas, West Plano Texas, East Rockwall County, Uptown Dallas, Valley Ranch, North Wylie and More

* Limited service areas are charged a fee of $20-$100 depending on your location.

* Additional handling/moving fees for stairs, inside the home removal of refrigerators, food or debris removal from fridge/freezer, front-load washing machines, televisions, highrise buildings and certain other situations. Most items located outside the home or in the garage will not be charged any fees.

Tags: free removal of unwanted appliances in Dallas, TX, old metal, scrap, steel, aluminum, copper, free pick up, drop off, disposal, haul off, haul away junk, bulk pick up, remove, removal, take down, commercial and residential, non working, where can I drop off non working appliances, disposal, air conditioners, Antique Pickers, appliance removal, computers, car battery recycling, batteries, boat motors, haul of junk cars in Dallas, TX cars, car parts, clothes dryers, dishwashers,  engines, estate sales, freezers, grills, hot water heaters, lawn mowers, Monitors, motors, printers, recycling, recycle, refrigerators, restaurant equipment, slot machines, storage locker units, stoves, trailers, transmissions, trucks, washers, washing machines, wrought iron fences, why, when, where can I,

 

Internet and Social Media by www.KorySimmons.com

www.dfwappliance.com -  www.DFWjunkcars.com 

Recycling is processing used materials (waste) into new products to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, reduce energy usage, reduce air pollution (from incineration) and water pollution (from landfilling) by reducing the need for "conventional" waste disposal, and lower greenhouse gas emissions as compared to virgin production. Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction and is the third component of the "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" waste hierarchy.

Recyclable materials include many kinds of glass, paper, metal, plastic, textiles, and electronics. Although similar in effect, the composting or other reuse of biodegradable waste – such as food or garden waste – is not typically considered recycling. Materials to be recycled are either brought to a collection center or picked up from the curbside, then sorted, cleaned, and reprocessed into new materials bound for manufacturing.

In the strictest sense, recycling of a material would produce a fresh supply of the same material—for example, used office paper would be converted into new office paper, or used foamed polystyrene into new polystyrene. However, this is often difficult or too expensive (compared with producing the same product from raw materials or other sources), so "recycling" of many products or materials involves their reuse in producing different materials (e.g., paperboard) instead. Another form of recycling is the salvage of certain materials from complex products, either due to their intrinsic value (e.g., lead from car batteries, or gold from computer components), or due to their hazardous nature (e.g., removal and reuse of mercury from various items). Critics dispute the net economic and environmental benefits of recycling over its costs, and suggest that proponents of recycling often make matters worse and suffer from confirmation bias. Specifically, critics argue that the costs and energy used in collection and transportation detract from (and outweigh) the costs and energy saved in the production process; also that the jobs produced by the recycling industry can be a poor trade for the jobs lost in logging, mining, and other industries associated with virgin production; and that materials such as paper pulp can only be recycled a few times before material degradation prevents further recycling. Proponents of recycling dispute each of these claims, and the validity of arguments from both sides has led to enduring controversy.